In Georgia, on-the-job injuries and fatalities are all too common and show no sign of decreasing. To promote greater safety, the 2016 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries has released data on the most dangerous jobs in the U.S. The results show that some industries are more hazardous than expected.

Topping the list was the logging industry, which suffered 135.9 on-the-job fatalities per 100,000 full-time or equivalent workers. This was followed by the categories of fishing workers, aircraft pilots/flight engineers and roofers. One surprising inclusion was the trash and recycling collection industry, which had a fatal work injury rate of 34.1.

Truck and sales drivers were ranked seventh overall. However, the BLS states that transportation accidents were the number one workplace hazard in 2016, accounting for 40 percent of on-the-job fatalities. The top 10 list also included iron/steel workers, farmers/ranchers, construction managers and grounds maintenance workers. Overall, 632 truck drivers, 116 farmers and 62 groundskeepers in all were killed in transportation accidents.

Workplace violence, though less common than a decade ago, rose in 2016 to become the second leading cause of workplace deaths. Besides cases of workers killing co-workers, there were frequent instances of customers robbing and assaulting employees. The latter, criminologists say, is the more likely danger.

Injured workers can file for workers’ compensation to have various expenses covered. This can include medical bills and lost wages. The details involved are numerous, so it’s important to consult with a lawyer before filing. A lawyer could assist with appeals as well.